#Sporos: When Contemporary dances to Caribbean rythms!

When does pure innocence slip away? How long does it take until you are integrated into society? What rules and norms do you have to abide by and how much of yourself do you have to lose so that you do not get lost?

What if you never fit in? Will you survive then?

Having in mind the unsolved debate of the unbending use of the street dance forms, we came upon #Sporos, a thirty-minute suite danced by twelve dancers under the choreographic direction of George Tzirtzipis. As our community has got comfortable with 2-minute choreographies that aim to extract solely the sentiment of excited admiration from the audience, it is actually refreshing to have both the time and the opportunity to dig deeper and experience a bundle of emotions over a piece of art made with street dance as one of its pillars

song: Hanuman by Rodrigo y Gabriela

In his latest work, George Tzirtzipis is trying to take a dive into uncharted waters in the realm of street and contemporary dance. In this thirty-minute piece, the audience comes face to face with a self-induced retrospection of their personal journey. The choreographer sets a handful of questions to the audience by creating imagery that challenges the very foundations of society imposed differences.

#Sporos talks about everyone’s everlasting fears and worries… the endless struggle for acceptance, the fear for anything different… the need to just be and be true.

Overlapping pieces and changes between solos, duets, and small and big group parts build up through the thirty minutes and conclude in a climax of energy and volume in a simple yet effective way. Images and symbols are being used to transmit not only a single message (or multiple ones), but also movement itself. Each and every gesture, movement and transfer on stage gives off the feeling of having something to say; of having a purpose.

#Sporos talks about everyone’s everlasting fears and worries, which are topics as timeless as human nature itself: the endless struggle for acceptance, the fear for anything different, the need to just be and be true. Dance has always been a safe place for the voiceless and the outcast but it has also been a way of expressing hidden truths and a way to bridge differences of opposing sites. This is what it is highlighted by the choreographer from the first to the last moment of #Sporos.

Dance has always been a safe place for the voiceless and the outcast but it has also been a way of expressing hidden truths and a way to bridge differences of opposing sites.

There is more to #Sporos, though; another noteworthy layer beyond the symbolic one. It is not only the use of street dance into a long coherent piece to convey a message − George Tzirtzipis has experimented with movement and choreography combined into a mixture of street and contemporary dance in such a way that the two cannot be distinguished. In the end, a new identity called “Afrotemporary Flow” is formed.

Was the piece successful after all? Did it convey its message to the audience? We can’t really answer that, but we can say that it left us pleasantly surprised and ready for more, craving to watch it again. That makes it at least interesting, which is what art can aspire to be.

song: Merecumbe by El Gran Combo

Info:

  • Coming from New York and Cyprus, George Tzirtzipis has travelled, danced, and taught in international salsa congresses in Europe, Asia, and America.
  • He counts more than 25 years of studies in dances that include salsa, Latin, contemporary, Afro, ballet, and Greek and Cypriot folklore dances. He is a graduate of the professional programme of the House of Performing Arts and he has also studied in both Athens and New York.
  • #Sporos was performed in Athens, Greece on 21st December, 2018. New dates for performances are to be announced soon.

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